A Directoral debut by Ewan McGregor

 
 

American Pastoral as a fantastic project that we were honoured to work on. Not only is it a powerful story by pulitzer prize winner Philip Roth that captures the turbulent differences between and father and daughter’s conflicting ideologies, but it is a project that we helped pitch the the Cannes Film Festival and won.

To break it down correctly, this project exists in two parts.

 
 
 
 

Part A: The first was the American Pastoral Hype Reel.

Supervixen were tasked by our good friends at Lakeshore Entertainment to help write and create a hype reel to take to the Cannes Film Festival to find investors and financial backers for the film. So that is what we did. Supervixen’s role was to create what is the B-side of the film’s hype reel. A reel that covered to core message of what American Pastoral was about and how it relates to the current political climate.

Referencing the stunning musical work from Terence Blanchard’s 25th Hour, we created a 1.5 minute reel that covered the radicalisation of the youth throughout the later 20th - 21st century and how that shift in ideology can have a straining affect on the family relationship.

From the days of the Weathermen in the late 60’s to the hackivist clan Anonymous, the Boston Bomber to the child soldier in the mid-east, this reel was designed to capture the diversity in opinion (from the noble to the horrifying) and how these opinions, when in motion, can carry a weight that is often felt by the families involved.

 
 
 

The following gallery contains a series of concept frames for what will become the hype reel we sent to Cannes.

 
 

Part B: The Title Sequence.

After the success of the hype reel, Supervixen was tasked with creating the main title sequence at the start of the film.

Taking influence from not only Philip Roth’s book, we wanted to create a title that had the essence found in the typography of the 40s and 50s. With this in mind, we finally chose ‘Albertus’. Named after Albertus Magnus, the thirteenth-century German philosopher and theologian.

 
 

This is a typeface created by Berthold Wolpe in the period 1932 to 1940 for the British branch of the printing company Monotype and was used a lot through out America during the post war period. 

The typeface was then hand painted as a way of remove the digital ‘perfection’ it had and replace that with a feeling of a hand crafted typeface, like you would find in shopfronts and signage.

 
 

The following images are some of the various type styles we created through out the development of this project.